Huge news for us (x2)!

Two bits of major news for Applecross Innovations that we’re thrilled to share!

1) Applecross now offers Microsoft Surface

In addition to our many other offerings, Applecross Innovations is now an authorized Microsoft Surface dealer.

Imagine the line that separates devices, laptops, desktops, and enterprise systems. With Microsoft Surface, there is no line …

It took us two years to qualify to provide Surface, but we know the work was worth it – more importantly, we know you will, too!

2) Applecross now a Gold Xerox Partner

Based on confirmed sales and levels of customer service, effective June 30, 2020, Applecross was elevated to the level of Gold Solutions Partner with Xerox.

This means that we can now provide sales, service, and financing directly the entire range of Xerox’s commercially available printers/copiers/scanners/fax machines and software.

Silo Smashers

Data integration saves our clients millions each month

Applecross Innovations sells and services the full suite of Microsoft cloud-based and on-premises data solutions.

We also lead the integration and customize the systems to make data work for our clients like no other firm out there.

Case in point:

A large, industrial client had purchased multiple proprietary software systems. Each system worked for one of many specific departments (HR, finance, health and safety, prequalification, contract management, etc.), but none of them worked together.

By integrating their data using Microsoft’s unified systems, we showed that client how to save more than $6 million each month on a single project.

That eliminated $216 million of scope creep for the project’s remaining life, and set them up for success on multiple projects after.

Thank you for your business!

Case in point (2):

Another supply-chain fulfilment client manages multiple warehouses.

We began a phased rollout at one of their properties: a 90,000 sq.-ft. maze of multi-tiered industrial racking served by multiple forklifts whirring 18 hours a day in and out of five loading bays.

Typical to each location, the client used one software system for scheduling deliveries, another for scheduling employees, and one for scheduling their truck fleet. They also used one system for mapping the store, one for stocking the racks, and another for fulfilling orders.

In an operation this size, things obviously get misplaced, staff forgot to mark down where inventory was stocked, and product simply went missing.

After setting up their new environment, we were delighted when, within 45 minutes, one of the managers located a series of misplaced pallets equal to $175,000.

Not a bad return on investment.

For more information on these or many other services, please contact us at orders@applecrossinc.com!

Hosting

Introductory sale on web domains

Applecross Innovations now sells and services web domains, hosting, and services!

To celebrate, until February 29, 2019, all domains ending with “.com” are on sale for $11.99.

If you need hosting, e-mail, or any other available domain, just click here, create an account, and shop away.

Financing

Lease or finance directly through Applecross Innovations

Applecross Innovations now offers financing for qualified customers – and through our new partnership with Xerox Financial Services – especially those who use Xerox.

For more information on the products we carry and finance (and terms), please contact us at orders@applecrossinc.com.

Dell

Applecross Innovations welcomes Dell to our ever-growing stable!

Applecross gives them Dell!

Applecross Innovations is pleased to announce that we are now authorized partners with Dell Technologies – one of more than 700 brands we carry from our locations in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nunavut, and Ontario.

Please call us for a quote on any and all of your technology needs!

1-833-333-2587 anywhere in Canada

(780) 623-3000 in Alberta

(306) 912-9991 in Saskatchewan

orders@applecrossinc.com

Silver Partners with Xerox

Applecross is now a silver-level partner with Xerox.

In recognition of our sales and service track record, Applecross Innovations is pleased to announce that we are now officially a silver-level partner with Xerox.

With the new designation comes additional pricing incentives we can pass on to our clients, and a whole new range of Xerox products we’re qualified to sell such as advanced multifunction machines that print on 11 x 17 paper!

In celebration, and while quantities last, we’re offering a huge discount on the Xerox Versalink C405 multifunction printer. For more details, please click here.

Xerox Special

Xerox VersaLink C405: A $1,300 machine for no more than $679.

Indigenous groups/people pay less* than we’re allowed to advertise …

HOKA! Behold: the beautiful Xerox VersaLink C405 multifunction printer/scanner/copier/fax machine.

It prints in colour on both sides. It scans. It copies. It faxes. It has a whole bunch of built-in apps and security features, its own legit serial number, a standard one-year warranty, and possibility for extended warranty.

We don’t recommend it, but our Auntie wanted to climb on top of one to reach further up the Saskatoon bushes (that would void any warranty, so we talked her into using a nice step ladder).

This machine usually sells for $1,279, but we have a limited quantity we can sell for much less. According to the terms of our agreement, we can advertise it for $679 … but if you whisper in our ear, we can probably do even better (wink, wink)!

For more information on these wonderful machines, you can download information sheets immediately below!

orders@applecrossinc.com

* The asterisk doesn’t really mean anything. We just put it there to get you to read this.

Tsawwassen First Nation

Indigenous Technology Summit

Tsawwassen First Nation representatives Virgil Awasis (left), Elder Barbara Joe, Applecross Innovations president Graham Andrews, and Delta Police community liaison Const. Mike Grandia

By Graham Andrews
Applecross Innovations

As Tsawwassen First Nation Elder Barbara Joe supports them with prayer, “her boys”, Virgil Awasis and Const. Mike Grandia, address a national gathering of Indigenous leaders and entrepreneurs, and representatives from the federal government and major tech manufacturers.

Describing the First Nation’s dividend-paying approach to restorative justice may be an unfamiliar experience for them, but their love is palpable.

That should come as no surprise. Love and kindness are the tools of the trade for Elder Barb, Virgil, Mike, and the TFN community on the whole; particularly when faced with actions that might be somewhat less than loving and kind.

In the approximately six years since reformalization, TFN’s traditional diversionary justice program has paired misled youth with Elders and other community members that reintroduce centuries-old teachings to emphasize reintegration over segregation. The resultant successes are obvious.

“Someone might be sentenced to do a certain number of community hours, but they find their place and keep coming back long after those hours have been finished,” said Elder Barb.

“When a person comes to see a mental-health worker or the probation officer, they’re not doing the ‘walk of shame’ anymore. People know they can talk about these things in the open.”

The youth diversion program has been so successful that Mike, a community liaison officer from the Delta Police Service, can’t recall the last time one of TFN’s youth was formally charged. The rate of reoffending has fallen to zero among former young-offenders who went through the program; a condition that, for Virgil, is a natural extension of healing historical traumas.

The youth diversion program received so much notice, in fact, that a B.C. judge recently referred a TFN adult to an age-appropriate diversion program that didn’t formally exist. So the First Nation did what came naturally; they welcomed the person who might otherwise have been sent to jail.

And it sets an excellent sometimes surprising example, Mike said, as he related the story of one young TFN member who self-consciously shuffled into the policeman’s office one morning not long ago.

“He told me that he had been out doing some mischief the night before,” said Mike. “He outran the police. And I said, ‘Wow, you must be pretty fast on your feet … but, why are you here now if you got away?’ And this young guy says, ‘Because I need diversion, Mike. I don’t want to be on the run.’ “

For more information on Tsawwassen First Nation’s diversion program, please contact them directly at mgrandia@deltapolice.ca or vawasis@tsawwassen.com.

Investigative Solutions Network

Indigenous Technology Summit

Marie Perry and David Perry, who leads Investigative Solutions Network Inc., are two of the nicest people you’d ever want to meet. Graham Andrews of Applecross Innovations met up with them recently.


Applecross Innovations

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before …

A M├ętis kid from Prince Albert, Saskatchewan bumps into a retired Toronto Police detective and his wife. They talk for a number of hours about their many similarities and vast differences, exchange hugs, then go their separate ways as new-found friends.

Contrary to the beliefs of many, while it’s not a frequent occurrence, it’s neither joke nor fantasy. The meetings (and not completely un-self-conscious embraces) actually occurred at the Indigenous Technology Summit held on Osoyoos Indian Band this past week.

David Perry, CEO with Investigative Solutions Network Inc., retired from the Toronto Police after a 28-year career investigating some of the city’s most notorious crimes. For 13 years now, Perry and ISN have been bringing their collective expertise to all manner of investigative services.

“Non-suspicious” deaths in Thunder Bay

Following the 2015 death of Stacey DeBungee in Thunder Bay, Ont., Perry was hired by Rainy River First Nation to look into why local police so quickly labeled their community member’s death as non-suspicious. A declaration of “no foul play” was issued related to the death within hours; a conclusion that can often take weeks to properly reach.

The ham-fisted police statement was made more insulting by the fact that Stacey DeBungee, 41, died during a public inquiry into police investigations of the earlier deaths of seven Indigenous teenagers along Thunder Bay’s river system. Those seven deaths were featured in Toronto Star reporter Tanya Talaga’s award-winning book, Seven Fallen Feathers.

As documented in a feature on CBC’s Fifth Estate (a link to which is embedded below), Perry and his team were able to quickly find multiple reasons to question the investigations into Stacey DeBungee’s death.

As importantly, IPN’s work contributed to a major overhaul of Thunder Bay Police which, according to an independent overview, was characterized by “systemic racism.”

For more information on ISN, check out their website at https://www.isninc.ca.

Computer Skills

Save for a few moments of connectivity frustrations, Buffalo Lake Metis Settlement members recently laughed their way through a computer-skills course led by Applecross.

Computer course at Buffalo Lake Metis Settlement

When the unavoidable challenges of running a small business pop up again, Buffalo Lake Metis Settlement will serve as Applecross Innovations’ happy place.

On November 15, more than a dozen Buffalo Lake Metis Settlement members completed our computer-skills course as led by Applecross president Graham Andrews, an outspokenly proud Metis himself. The course included principles of computing, general online safety, application use, and pointers to ease anxieties related to computers.

“I don’t believe I’ve ever led a training session with more laughter, one that ended with more hugs and handshakes, or one where more participants already wanted to sign up for an advanced class.”

Graham Andrews, Applecross Innovations president following a recent computer-skills course at Buffalo Lake Metis Settlement

Alberta is home to eight communities unlike any other in the world: the Metis Settlements.

These are the only eight communities where ownership of the land is protected by legislation as owned by Metis, one of Canada’s three constitutionally recognized distinct groups of Indigenous peoples.